1. (Source: awakethesoul)

  2. peteandpetegifs:

    I knew the song would attract Artie, the Strongest Man in the World, like a giant funk magnet. And sure enough…

    "Nya-ha-ha! Music of the gods! I am large on George Clinton!"

  3. Tonight on Fox News

    Neoconservatism 2: Let’s talk about ISIS

    Edit: Aw shit. Now Mark Levin’s on rambling about the UN and US sovereignty and endorsing a second shutdown and impeachment.

    Even if you believe in this stuff, how do you bear to just sit there all day and listen? I could not listen to any news all day without going nuts

  4. hodgman:

The government doesn’t want you to move the cairns. ASK YOURSELF: WHY?

    hodgman:

    The government doesn’t want you to move the cairns. ASK YOURSELF: WHY?

  5. centuriespast:

Fudo
Japan, Koyasan Temple
19th Century
Statue of Fudo, one of the Myo-o (Knowledge Kings), sits in the midst of fire symbolizing invulnerability. Also known as the immovable one, he is a part of a fierce class of protective deities who form an important category in Shingon art. Often depicted holding a lasso and vajra hilted sword, the statue was secured by Maxwell Sommerville from Koyasan Temple in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan. He wears a metal and bead necklace and sits on a stylized rock formation. His sword is missing. 
Penn Museum

    centuriespast:

    Fudo

    Japan, Koyasan Temple

    19th Century

    Statue of Fudo, one of the Myo-o (Knowledge Kings), sits in the midst of fire symbolizing invulnerability. Also known as the immovable one, he is a part of a fierce class of protective deities who form an important category in Shingon art. Often depicted holding a lasso and vajra hilted sword, the statue was secured by Maxwell Sommerville from Koyasan Temple in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan. He wears a metal and bead necklace and sits on a stylized rock formation. His sword is missing. 

    Penn Museum

  6. huntingtonlibrary:

    The Corpse Flower began to open Saturday afternoon, peaked in the middle of the night, and spent its Sunday getting pollinated and starting to close in front of the crowds who poured in to see and smell this wacky botanical wonder. By Monday (pictured in this set), it was pretty much closed back up AND STILL CRAZY BEAUTIFUL. (And—not pictured here—botanists collected pollen that’ll be frozen ‘til it can be used on another bloom here or elsewhere.)

    And now we wait to see whether the pollination worked. It’ll be quite a while before we know, though, so The Huntington’s tumblr will be going back to its regular, non-Stinky5 programming. Thank you for tuning in.

  7. merlin:

thememegeneration:

Attack eyebrows! (h/t notactuallyme)

They’re “independently cross.”

    merlin:

    thememegeneration:

    Attack eyebrows! (h/t notactuallyme)

    They’re “independently cross.”

  8. This started as an exceedingly long Facebook post, but I thought this was a better place to put it. These are my three favorite fun-to-read history things. (Feel free to add yours!)

    The first is an article called The Ballad of Geeshie and Elvie, which traces the social history of female blues artists through the lives of two seemingly lost great artists, Elvie Thomas and Geeshie Wiley. Along the way, the author explores the social lives of urban African American communities, the early recording industry, and a whole lot of stunning detail. The way it is presented is really impressive too, mixing video, audio interviews, the women’s surviving songs, and really beautiful prose.

    The first book is Annals of the Former World by John McPhee. Winner of the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction, it’s only kind of a history book. McPhee tells the geological history of the United States, and along the way, the history of geology as a discipline. If this sounds deadly dull, I thought it would be too, but the way he narrates the creation of a landscape over eons is beautiful and striking. If you are interested at all in the longue durée mode of history writing, McPhee should be an inspiration. The geologists he meets, particularly one who comes from a long line of Montana ranchers, are interesting enough that at times you wish they had their own book.

    The last one is a little closer to my own work. Frances Karttunen is a linguist, anthropologist, and historian who has done so much to shape our understanding of Nahuatl, the language spoken in the former Aztec Empire. In Between Worlds: Interpreters, Guides, and Survivors she turns to the men and women (especially women), who facilitated contact between cultures. Ranging from Finland to Mesoamerica to San Francisco, she writes these lovely little biographies of each person before bringing them together in a sort of thematic essay about them. She unites the stories of these people in the basic (very hard) realities of their lives. I love her openness to possibility, emotion, and ambiguity, which we so often avoid as a profession. It has totally shaped my dissertation and the way I approach human subjects, and I adore it.

  9. comixology:

    Ms. Marvel never fails to drop the serious knowledge.

  10. travelingcolors:

    Streets of Triana, Sevilla | Spain (by Nacho Coca)